Nicaragua, a great tourist destination in Central America

Nicaragua, a great tourist destination in Central America

By Raúl Gavarrette O.

Nicaragua, located in the middle of Central America, is the largest country in the area with a population of about five million and a land area of 130,700 square kilometers. Situated between Honduras and Costa Rica, Nicaragua has access to the Atlantic Ocean on the East, and the Pacific Ocean on the West. Along both coasts, beautiful beaches and spectacular views are to be enjoyed. There are two big fresh water lakes: Xolotlan Lake and the Cocibolca Lake. The Cocibolca Lake is the eighth biggest lake in the world. Granada is a colonial city situated on shores of big Lake Cocibolca; there you can enjoy the islets known as Isletas de Granada with tours leaving from Puerto Asese and Cabaña Amarilla. In the big lake there are other Islands near San Jorge port known as Ometepe Island and an archipelago near San Carlos known as Solentiname Archipelago. This big lake Cocibolca flows into the Nicaraguan Caribbean through the Río San Juan. Nicaragua has been blessed by nature for having the biggest amount of active and dormant volcanoes, fresh water lakes, untouched forests and crater lakes in the whole region. After decades of political military conflicts, peace was finally established in 1990. Since then, Nicaragua has been gaining a good reputation for being a stable, democratic and a safe country for investors and tourists. Since 1990 thousands of travelers from many countries have visited Nicaragua and have enjoyed not only the climate of peace, reconciliation and safeness but the beautiful yet undiscovered cities and sandy tropical beaches this Central American country offers. Its rich history, friendly, simple and hospitable people, colonial cities, indigenous culture, volcanoes, lakes, exotic islands and unspoiled sandy beaches have turned the country, in the last decade, into one of the hottest, safest and most exciting Central American destinations. Nicaragua, a beautiful tropical country with a great biodiversity, an incredible multilingual, multicultural and multi ethnic population, and a great vocation for poetry, traditional music and literature has a lot to offer among the wide variety of locations such as the green mountains and coffee farms in the North; beautiful beaches and colonial cities on the Pacific, fantastic archipelagos and islands in the Big Lake Cocibolca; peaceful rivers and virgin jungles on the Atlantic region as well as exotic islands on the Caribbean Sea. Rio San Juan, a Nicaraguan huge river, offers beautiful jungle destinations on shores where there are ecological hotels. The Islas del Maíz known as Corn Islands are a great paradise on the Nicaraguan Caribbean. With no doubts, Nicaragua is a great destination! Enjoy it! Courtesy of Escuela de Español “Proyecto Lingüístico Inter-Cultural”, http://www.nicaragua-spanish-lessons.com


Best 7 Spanish Schools in Granada Nicaragua 2017

Best 7 Spanish Schools in Granada Nicaragua 2017

By Raúl Gavarrette O.

Long has been the path since the early 80´s first Spanish language schools in Nicaragua opened in the northern Estelí Nicaraguan province. This self-sustainable clean industry has experienced a boom over the last years since late 90´s, particularly in Granada downtown, the first colonial city in Nicaragua. At the present, Granada has a growing network of independent Spanish language schools which through the years have gained experience and reputation among the increasing number of visitors that have chosen Nicaragua as the safest Central American country to visit.  Studying Spanish is a good option while visiting this tropical country. Those who are planning or have already decided to visit Nicaragua should explore the possibility to make a great combination of a vacation trip with a few days, a couple of weeks, or even months of Spanish language study in Granada language schools.

With so many new schools opening every year in this colonial city, it is some kind of difficulty to choose the best option and what Spanish school in Granada is the best for studying. It mostly depends on the interests or what you are looking for and how much you want to spend. In the city streets you will find people not necessarily teachers, offering Spanish lessons in Granada for a few cents mostly for economic reasons. Academic and effective quality should not be expected from them. Perhaps if you just want to learn some Spanish words by heard and repetition and do not want to spend much this could be an option not the best yet.

Most of the Spanish schools in Granada offer a mixture of language instruction, volunteer opportunities and excursions to nearby destinations which include crater lakes, boat tours, cigar factories, and walking city tours. Lodging with local families in Granada is also included in the Spanish studies packets offered by the language schools. Each school has different prices for the Spanish courses ranging between $280 and $350 for a week. This mainly depends on the kind of course you choose and the quality of services they offer. The more weeks you take the cheaper you get. If you are seriously considering learning Spanish in Granada Nicaragua, having fun, experiencing the culture and enjoying the surroundings and the beautiful nature, you should have a look at these seven best Granada Spanish schools mentioned in this article. These are the Spanish language schools that have stood out up to 2017 for their reputation and experience, for their ethic and honesty, and the professionalism of the business.

1. Nicaragua Spanish Schools (http://www.nicaragua-spanish-lessons.com) is an independent language school located in Granada downtown a few blocks from the Central Plaza, in the surroundings of Xalteva Church, formerly situated in Convento San Francisco. This school offers Spanish immersion courses, one-on-one lessons and in small groups from basic beginners to advanced superior levels. The courses are combined with amazing afternoon excursions to local destinations which include nature reserves, national parks, crater lakes, boat tours in Lake Cocibolca; visits to open markets, handicraft factories, active and dormant volcanoes. This Nicaraguan Spanish language school offers also Spanish and Ceramic courses; Medical Spanish courses; Spanish for College students; Spanish for travelers, Crash courses, and Online Spanish lessons. Homestay with friendly families is available; there are also all-included packets. Some of the teachers speak English but they use it only when it is necessary or requested. The maximum size of the class is four students but average size is one-two students per class. Class material is provided. Spanish instruction is usually Monday to Friday all year round opening every Monday but any student can start any day of the week according to personal schedule on arrival. Students are offered to study one week course as minimum length but can take as many weeks as desired. Airport pickup from Managua to Granada is available if requested. Volunteering is also possible previous request. The staff is very enthusiastic and dynamic. The Director and the Administrative Assistant are also very nice. This school has been providing job opportunities to its teachers since 2004 at the very early organization stage and promoted conservationist and reforestation small projects in Laguna de Apoyo along with its partner school in that area. Students are offered to volunteer. Recently the school has been chosen as the best school for training volunteers and cooperants from Asian and European countries who volunteer in Nicaragua.

 2. Nicaragua Mia Spanish School (http://spanishschoolnicaraguamia.com ) is situated on Caimito Street, near Central Plaza in Granada. It is operated by a cooperative of women who offer Spanish courses: one-on-one intensive, Spanish for travelers, business Spanish, and classes for children. The courses include class materials. The school is opened throughout the year 8-5 pm. Classes start every Monday. The basic week course includes Spanish lessons Monday to Friday in the mornings, afternoon local excursions, and homestay with Granada families. Transportation from Airport to school in Granada is provided by school at an additional cost.

3. SOL Spanish School (http://www.granadanicaraguaspanishschool.com ), a language school family owned, is located at a few blocks from Central Park and from Xalteva Church. The school offers Spanish courses from beginners to advanced levels. SOL Spanish School has a wide range of courses for the students: Spanish immersion classes; Spanish classes only; combo programs; online Spanish classes; Volunteering and Spanish classes. The standard program includes Spanish classes Monday to Friday, lodging with a host family, and local afternoon activities. The activities include visits to museums, clinics, artisan shops, local factories, farms, and NGO´s. Classes are usually 8-12m.; but they also offer afternoon lessons. The class size is 1-2 students per class. The school provides class materials. Some of the teachers speak English and use it in the class if requested by students. Transfer from Managua Airport to Granada can be arranged through the school.

 4. Spanish Dale School (http://spanishdale.com  ) is situated across from Bancentro Bank and offers one-on-one language Spanish lessons.  The school was part of APC former Spanish school for many years. They became an independent school a couple of years ago. This school is associated with a local hotel in the city and offers an optional combination of lessons and lodging. Classes are usually 8-12m.; but they also offer afternoon lessons. Local afternoon excursions are also offered by the school. One of the teachers speaks English and uses it in the class if requested by students. The school is opened every day all year round. Transfer from Managua Airport to Granada can be arranged through the school.

5. APC Spanish School (http://spanishgranada.com ) is situated across from Central Park and offers language immersion classes.  The school is a project of the organization ‘The Association of Cultural Promoters’ (APC). Basically the school offers Spanish courses in the mornings, local daily excursions in the afternoons, room and board with local families. Students have opportunities to volunteer with local organizations through the school. Spanish courses for children are available at the APC School in Granada. Regular classes are Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The school is opened every day all year round.

6. Casa Xalteva Spanish School (http://www.casaxalteva.org) situated by the Xalteva church offers a packet stressed on volunteering. It is one of the oldest Spanish schools established in Granada. Located in a quiet location, this school offers intensive Spanish courses for beginners, intermediate and advanced language students. The class size is two-three students per class, sometimes one- to-one. Lessons take place for four hours daily from Monday to Friday. The Spanish lessons are emphasized on conversational skills. Some of the instructors at the school speak English but they use only Spanish since the first day of class to encourage the students to speak, write and read the language from the very first day in the program. Classes start every Monday all year round. Minimum length of a course is one week but students can study for weeks or months if desired. Transportation from Airport available if requested.

7. Spanish School Xpress (http://www.nicaspanishschool.com) is located in Calle Guzman, a few blocks from Central Plaza. It offers a complete program of Spanish immersion. Classes are adapted to the student’s interest and to his/her level of Spanish. The staff is young and very enthusiastic. Some of the teachers speak English if needed in the class. The basic program includes 20 hours of Spanish classes, 5 days a week, in the morning 8-12m; afternoon local activities, lodging with local families. Class material is supplied, one-on-one instruction. This Spanish school also offers customized programs, Spanish and Dancing, and business Spanish. Airport pickup provided upon request.


Nicaragua resort in rural Granada

Nekupe in Nandaime, located in Granada Nicaragua

One of you dreams of lying on the beach, and the other wants to soak up local culture and have once-in-a-lifetime adventures? If that’s the case, where to honeymoon may just be the easiest compromise you’ll make in your entire marriage. Nicaragua is the tropical destination guaranteed to please both adrenaline junkies and relaxation seekers. An ideal mix of exotic and easy, it’s a short, direct flight from Miami, Atlanta, Dallas, and Los Angeles, and U.S. dollars are accepted everywhere (along with the local currency, cordobas). It’s also a place where you can surf in the Pacific Ocean or down mountains of volcanic ash, zip line along cloud forests, tour Spanish colonial cities and sunbathe along the Caribbean coast—all in the same week if that’s how you roll. (Before your parents start having flashbacks to news anchors discussing the post-revolutionary conflict of the 1980s, reassure them that Nicaragua is the safest country in Latin America according to the Gallup Law and Order Index.) And while it’s more undiscovered and less developed than neighboring Costa Rica, Nicaragua’s tourist infrastructure is growing quickly and thoughtfully—meaning you’ll have your pick of luxury eco-resorts to serve as home base.

Where to Stay: The closest thing to having your own private island is a room at Jicaro Island Ecolodge on one of the 365 islets that dot vast Lake Cocibolca. It’s just off the waterfront of the lovely colonial town of Granada, where the Tribal Hotel is the most Insta-ready option among a plethora of inns in converted mansions whose central courtyards now hold small swimming pools. Mukul is the swankiest spot on the Pacific coast, set between an incredible surfing beach and a top of the line golf course; or Maderas Village is the perfect option for modern, free-spirited couples who enjoy waking up in the jungle before taking a morning swim at Playa Maderas, a five-minute walk down the hill. Inland, brand-new Nekupe is an intimate sporting lodge on a 1,300-acre nature reserve where rangers guide you through horseback riding, skeet shooting, and cultural excursions (an on-site spa is set to open this spring). To see a completely different part of Nicaragua (and one most tourists miss) fly to the Caribbean side of the country for a stay at Yemaya on Little Corn Island. If all of the brand-new rooms with private plunge pools are booked, fear not—the turquoise waters of the Caribbean are just a few steps away.

When to Go: It’s beach-weather warm year-round, but May-November is the rainy season, with short tropical showers and more cloud cover, especially in September and October. December-April is drier and (even) hotter. – Eleni N. Gage, Author of The Ladies of Managua.


Masaya volcano and the Spanish in Nicaragua

Visitas. El lago de lava atrae a miles de visitantes, quienes no dudan en pagar US$10 por ver el espectáculo de la naturaleza.

http://www.elnuevodiario.com.ni/nacionales/393681-volcan-masaya-atraccion-turistica-nicaragua/

Desafiando el intenso olor a azufre, los turistas se acercan para asomarse al pozo de lava que bulle muy cerca de la superficie en el cráter del volcán Masaya, cuya furia trataron de aplacar los indígenas en el pasado sacrificando doncellas y niños.

“Es algo extraordinario, único en el mundo”, dice a la AFP Noheli Pravia, una turista francesa mientras observa el turbulento magma que se aprecia desde el borde del cráter a menos de 100 metros de profundidad.

El Masaya, el Kilauea de Hawai y el Nyiragongo de África son los únicos volcanes del mundo que forman de manera periódica efusiones de magma en su cráter, afirma el geógrafo y ambientalista nicaragüense Jaime Incer.

La lava del “Masaya”, ubicado a 20 kilómetros de la capital nicaragüense, emerge a la superficie cada 25 o 30 años desde 1902 y después de un tiempo desaparece, pero mantiene la emisión de humos sulfurosos que se esparcen en los alrededores, oxidando los techos de las casas y asolando la vegetación.

Según Incer, si el material incandescente sube de nivel en cada aparición, es posible que dentro de 150 años el volcán haga una erupción similar a la de 1772, cuando el flujo llegó hasta donde hoy funciona el aeropuerto internacional.

A unos kilómetros del volcán se asienta el pueblo de Piedra Quemada que guarda los vestigios de aquella erupción: un lecho de piedras volcánicas que yacen bajo un relleno de tierra.

“Antes aquí no había tierra sino piedras”, dice a la AFP Sandra Pérez, uno de los 6,000 habitantes que han aprendido a vivir con el volcán y que no creen que sea una amenaza.

IMPRESIONANTE

El pequeño cono, de 400 metros de altura, surgió hace 5,000 años. Está constituido por cinco cráteres de los cuales solo uno -llamado Santiago y el más grande- permanece activo, coronado por una densa fumarola.

Hace seis meses, el agujero incrementó su actividad con flujos de magma acompañado de esporádicos microsismos.

“Es la primera vez que veo algo como esto, es muy impresionante”, expresa Mijaela Cuba, una enfermera austriaca.

Ella es una de los 4,000 turistas que han subido a la ardiente garganta en las últimas dos semanas, cuando el Gobierno autorizó el ingreso de personas, aunque limitado a unos pocos minutos debido a los gases.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUyt-T-AmCM

Solo los pericos verdes y los murciélagos logran sobrevivir anidando permanentemente en el ambiente tóxico del cráter.

Es “muy especial”, agrega entusiasmada la joven taiwanesa Sami Yen que toma fotos al borde del cráter desde donde se escucha el oleaje magmático.

El volcán está ubicado en la zona más poblada del Pacífico nicaragüense y forma parte de un área protegida de 54 kilómetros cuadrados, en la que sobresalen vastos campos de lava petrificada, poblada por blancos árboles de Sacuanjoche, la flor nacional.

Abundan las serpientes, monos cara blanca y animales que soportan altas temperaturas, asegura el guía Luis Solano.

La boca del infierno

HISTORIA • Las llamas del “Masaya”, que hizo dos fuertes erupciones en 1670 y 1772, asustaron a los conquistadores españoles.

“Es una boca de fuego que jamás deja de arder”, escribió en 1525 el primer gobernador Pedrarias Dávila, al rey de España.

El fraile Francisco de Bobadilla creía que se trataba de la puerta al infierno, por lo que instaló una enorme cruz a la orilla del cráter.

Mientras que el codicioso Fray Blas del Castillo pensó que la lava era oro derretido y bajó colgado de una canasta para extraer material, según la leyenda.

Los indígenas chorotegas que habitaron la zona trataron de calmar al enfurecido volcán ofreciendo en sacrificio niños y doncellas a la bruja “Chalchihuehe” que según ellos, vivía dentro del foso ardiente.

En los años 70, la dictadura somocista lanzó a la boca del volcán a un excolaborador de la guerrilla sandinista, David Tejada, cuenta a la AFP la también excolaboradora sandinista Vilma Núñez.


Visit Nicaragua in 2017

Nicaragua, a competitive destination!

http://www.elnuevodiario.com.ni/nacionales/414686-nicaragua-top-10-paises-visitar-2017/

Una importante revista de viaje de Reino Unido colocó a Nicaragua en el puesto número 6 en su guía de países destinos de 2017

La revista Rough Guides, de Reino Unido, publicó su guía de países a visitar en 2017  y ubicó a Nicaragua en el puesto número seis de los mejores destinos de este año.

En la guía solamente aparecen dos países latinoamericanos, Nicaragua y Bolivia que ocupa el puesto numero cinco. Estos compiten con La India, Escocia, Canadá, Ungana, Portugal, Finlandia, Namibia y Taiwán que ocupan los demás lugares  del top diez de esta lista.

En la guía publicada en el sitio web de la revista, se destaca que Nicaragua es el país más grande de Centroamérica, que pose ciudades coloniales, la hospitalidad de sus habitantes y el bajo costo de hacer turismo en este país en comparación  a otros de Centroamérica.

“Sus playas perfectas que siguen siendo algunas de las más vírgenes de la región, la ampliación de las rutas de vuelo están abriendo a Nicaragua al mundo, para viajeros aventureros, Nicaragua oferta lo mejor de Centroamérica, los bosques tropicales densos, viajes de surf épicos, retiros ecológicos remotos y excursiones a volcanes son sólo algunas de las actividades que usted encontrará en Nicaragua”, destacó la publicación de la revista.

Recientemente, la revista Travel & Leisure, incorporó a dos destinos del país en la lista de  los 50 mejores lugares para viajar en 2017.

La revista, en su sitio web, incluye a Nicaragua y Panamá dentro de la selecta lista y se convierten en los únicos países centroamericanos que entraron en el ranking

http://www.elnuevodiario.com.ni/nacionales/414686-nicaragua-top-10-paises-visitar-2017/


Nicaragua, a tourist destination

http://vostv.com.ni/natgeo-travel-promueve-nicaragua-como-destino/

La reconocida publicación National Geographic Travel en su versión digital, eligió a Nicaragua como uno de los diez destinos sorprendentes para este 2016.

El artículo escrito por Tara Isabella Burton empieza indicando que ser país vecino de Honduras y Guatemala, dos de los países más violentos del mundo, ha afectado en algún momento la reputación de casi toda Centroamérica, pero el país es una excepción.

“Nicaragua -a pesar de estar entre los países más pobres de América Latina- es también uno de los más seguros. Su tasa de homicidios es solo de 11 por cada 100.000 personas (en comparación con 82 en Honduras)”, destaca la edición en inglés de esta revista de viajes.

El texto señala que la “relativa escasez” de la violencia relacionada con pandillas hace que Nicaragua sea un punto de vista ideal para explorar la cultura de Centroamérica.

“No se vaya de Nicaragua sin probar el Vigorón, yuca suave hervida cubierta con cerdo frito crujiente y ensalada de repollo”

“Relajarse en las playas de este país de América Central, que cuenta con acceso tanto al Mar Caribe como  al Océano Pacífico”, es la recomendación que realiza NatGeo Travel.

LEER MAS EN: http://vostv.com.ni/natgeo-travel-promueve-nicaragua-como-destino/


Masaya Volcano and Spanish course in Nicaragua

Mitos, leyendas y verdades del volcán Masaya

La morada de Satanás, los hechizos de una bruja, dos ríos de fuego, el proyecto de unos alemanes y un atractivo turístico. El volcán Masaya ha sido protagonista de todo tipo de historias. Revista Domingo y Jaime Incer le presentan las más sorprendentes.

Por Jaime Incer Barquero y Fabrice Le Lous

http://www.laprensa.com.ni/2016/09/04/suplemento/la-prensa-domingo/2094531-mitos-leyendas-y-verdades-del-volcan-masaya

Antes de inmortalizarse como el conquistador de Nicaragua, Francisco Hernández de Córdoba tuvo el privilegio de ser el primero en describir un volcán del Nuevo Mundo en letras castellanas. Cumplida su misión de valorar las costas de Panamá hasta Nicoya, el teniente se adentró con 200 hombres a su cargo en las tierras del norte, exploradas anteriormente por Gil González, y conoció lo que parecía la morada del mismísimo Satanás. De noche, con su nube de gas encendida en rojo, el volcán Masaya sugería que el infierno se encontraba en Nicaragua.

En el año 1524 escribió el explorador: “En esta provincia de Masaya sale una boca de fuego muy grande que jamás deja de arder y de noche parece que toca el cielo del grande fuego que es y se ven 15 leguas como de día”. El texto iba dirigido a su jefe, Pedro Arias Dávila, gobernador de Castilla de Oro, hoy Panamá. Fue el primer volcán descrito en español en América.

La presencia del lago de lava burbujeante al fondo del cráter del Masaya (actual cráter Nindirí) hizo especular a muchos. Un fraile llamado Francisco de Bobadilla, convencido de que en Masaya estaba “La Boca del Infierno”, trató de exorcizar el espectáculo ígneo instalando una cruz en la cima del cráter, pero no funcionó. Poco después, sin embargo, al fray dominico Blas del Castillo se le ocurrió que a lo mejor no era un pedazo de infierno lo que contemplaban, sino una fuente de riquezas.

En 1538 el fray Blas del Castillo descendió al fondo del ardiente cráter tentado por la idea de que aquella mácula incandescente era oro puro derretido. El capitán de la Conquista, Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés, recogió la aventura en sus crónicas (disponibles en la biblioteca virtual de Enrique Bolaños):

“Dijo el padre que ninguno de los que allí han subido saben decir ni afirmar qué cosa es aquello que ven en aquel profundo; porque unos dicen que es oro, otros que es plata y otros que es cobre. Otros dicen que es hierro, otros piedra, azufre, agua y otros dicen que es el infierno o el respiradero del mal”.

Lea también: El despertar de los volcanes

Blas del Castillo bajó tres veces acompañado por osados segundos, no sin mucho metraje de resistentes cuerdas que empujaban decenas de indígenas. Pero al cabo de su travesía, el padre notó lo que hoy es obviedad: esa masa de luz rojiza que se agita como mar en tormenta es indomable. Y no era ni por cerca un bien que ellos pudiesen tomar y repartir a pobres, como él propuso.

Hoy, no es el cráter Nindirí el que posee una boca de magma efervescente, sino el Santiago, pero el fenómeno similar no deja de maravillar a propios y extraños. La revista National Geographic, de hecho, está filmando un documental sobre la atracción turística y en 2011 History Channel hizo lo mismo y lo presentó como lo pensaban antaño: una “puerta al infierno” del mundo.

Estos son mitos, leyendas e historias reales del volcán Masaya que pocos conocen, pero que lo han estampado en los anales de Nicaragua como ningún otro volcán.

LA MISTERIOSA BRUJA VOLCÁNICA

La próxima vez que visite la montaña tenga presente este dato: en el cráter del Masaya hubo sacrificios humanos. Siglos atrás, niños y jóvenes fueron arrojados al magma incandescente en el nombre de días mejores. La lava consumió sus cuerpos y ahogó sus gritos en segundos.

La mejor descripción del coloso masayense es la del cronista de la Corona española, Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés, quien ascendió al volcán en 1529. El aventurero observó la feroz marea de lava en el fondo del cráter y presentó el primer dibujo de la montaña, el cual remitió al rey de la península ibérica, Carlos I.

Oviedo y Valdés fue guiado en Masaya por nadie menos que Nacatime, el cacique de Nindirí. Él le contó la creencia y temor de los indígenas por una deidad profética que emergía de las entrañas del fuego según le viniera en gana y pronosticaba asuntos de importancia a los caciques que tuvieran el valor (o el miedo) de reunirse dentro del cráter. La hechicera les decía, según la crónica, la agenda secreta del volcán: cuándo estaban planeadas las erupciones y los movimientos telúricos y se sabía también el cronograma del clima, pues exponía las sequías y otros fenómenos naturales.

A veces, revela la crónica de Oviedo y Valdés, la bruja del fuego aparecía hecha un torbellino de furia y la única forma de apaciguarla era lanzando a infantes y jóvenes mujeres a la lava.

 La bruja, mencionada como una especie de diosa, fue descrita así, en el español de la época:

“Bien vieja era é arrugada, é las tetas hasta el ombligo, y el cabello poço alçado háçia arriba, é los dientes luengos é agudos, como perro, é la color más oscura é negra que los indios, é los ojos hundidos y ençendidos”; y en fin él la pintaba en sus palabras como debe ser el diablo. “Y esse mesmo debia ella ser, é si este deçia verdad, no se puede negar su comunicaçion de los indios é del diablo”.

La identifican hoy como la Chalchihuehe de la mitología náhuatl, diosa del agua y de la lluvia, pero los españoles no querían saber de brujas meteorológicas. Para ellos era el demonio, a secas, y les sirvió como pretexto para continuar la cristianización forzada de ese pedacito de América. Además, al parecer, los indios también pintaban imágenes que corroboraban el horror de los europeos.

“Según pinturas”, señalan los escritos de Oviedo y Valdés, “los indios suelen pintar al diablo, que es tan feo y lleno de colas, cuernos, bocas y otros rostros, como nuestros pintores lo suelen hacer a los pies del arcángel San Miguel o del apóstol San Bartolomé. Sospecho que le deben de haber visto y que se les debe mostrar de forma semejante. Y así lo ponen en sus oratorios o casas y templos”.

En su última aparición se dice que la raída bruja amenazó a los caciques de que no volverían a verla en sus monéxicos o reuniones de consulta, mientras no expulsasen de sus territorios a los invasores cristianos, lo cual, sabemos, nunca ocurrió.

El fenómeno de la pitonisa de senos flácidos y caídos, poderes mágicos y comportamiento volátil sirvió entonces como herramienta de adoctrinamiento, pues el catolicismo ofrecía una válvula de escape al horror que ella representaba, pero la cercanía de Oviedo y Valdés con el cacique Nacatime también arrojó interesantes datos sobre el volcán. Supo el cronista, por ejemplo, que el cráter vecino (hoy llamado San Fernando), contuvo lava en tiempos muy pasados, antes que la actividad volcánica se mudara al cráter Nindirí.

Analizando las evidencias históricas puede decirse que este fenómeno migra a lo largo del tiempo. En 1670 el cráter Nindirí se colmó de lava y quedó ocluido. La fuerte actividad de 1772 fue por un costado del cono San Fernando y posteriormente, en 1853, la actividad se registró en el cráter Santiago y allí permanece hasta hoy.

LA MAYOR ERUPCIÓN DEL VOLCÁN MASAYA

Todo comenzó en la mañana del 16 de marzo de 1772. La ladera norte del volcán se había puesto tan caliente que el ganado que pastaba en ella desertó del terreno. Instinto sabio, porque de pronto hubo un fuerte temblor en las entrañas del volcán Masaya y en esa parte de la montaña se abrió una grieta que dio paso a un extenso vómito de lava. La masa ardiente fluyó y se bifurcó. Por un lado alcanzó la Laguna de Masaya y por otro, atravesó el camino real y continuó avanzando por los siguientes días en dirección al Lago de Managua, deteniéndose en el sitio llamado El Portillo (cerca de lo que conocemos hoy como Sabana Grande).

La erupción duró nueve días y alarmó a las poblaciones vecinas de Nindirí y Masaya. La gente huyó despavorida hacia Granada desde el primer momento. El éxodo fue tal que las familias abandonaron sus hogares sin siquiera cerrar las puertas, así que el gobernador de Masaya mandó a cerrarlas, porque sabía que quedarían vacías por un tiempo.

Pese a la alarma, un puñado de devotos se quedaron en los pueblos y sacaron en procesión penitencial su imagen religiosa más “potente” y la llevaron al borde de la laguna vecina al volcán. Un informe de esos días señala lo siguiente:

“El volcán Masaya reventó en el año 1772 (martes 16 de marzo) a las 9:00 de la mañana, oyéndose un retumbo que asustó a toda la población. Como a las 10:00 hubo un temblor y a las 11:00 de ese mismo día reventó, viéndose salir llamas de fuego que se dirigían para (hacia) esta población. El diácono Don Pedro Castrillo entró en la parroquia, acompañado de muchachos, tomó del sepulcro la imagen de la Asunción y se dirigió al bajadero de San Juan rezando las letanías de la Virgen; llegó a la orilla del agua, hirviendo por el fuego sobre esta como si fuera manteca, formando borbotones. Cuando presentó la imagen un viento recio desvió la corriente de fuego para el lado norte y él se fue por la orilla hasta llegar al bajadero de San Jerónimo y volviendo a soplar el viento, el fuego se fue como para Nindirí, en cuyo lugar tenían al Señor de los Milagros en la orilla de la playa y vieron retroceder el fuego por donde hizo la erupción”.

En la actualidad es posible observar el agreste campo negro de la lava petrificada —Piedra Quemada, la llaman los locales— que sale de un costado del cerro y se extiende hacia el norte, hasta el borde de la gran caldera que circunscribe al complejo volcánico. La vegetación raquítica que medra sobre esos campos rocosos no ha logrado enmascarar la textura áspera del campo de lava.

Gracias al acto religioso o no, el volcán estuvo tranquilo hasta 1853, cuando repentinamente en la plaza que separa el Nindirí del San Fernando surgió un nuevo vórtice no mayor de 60 metros de diámetro: el actual cráter Santiago, que nació entonces emitiendo lava ardiente y salpicante. La lava de esta nueva erupción se derramó hacia el sur y es la causante de los túneles de lava, entre ellos el llamado Tzinancostoc (la cueva de murciélagos), muy visitado por los turistas. En las décadas siguientes el Santiago experimentó repetidas emisiones al mismo tiempo que se hundía en su chimenea y agrandaba su diámetro. Hoy se estima que de la boca del cráter hasta el lago de lava hay unos 400 metros de profundidad.

CÓMO TAPAR UN VOLCÁN

En 1927, a dos ingenieros alemanes que laboraban en Nicaragua se les ocurrió una brillante idea. Respondían a los apellidos Schomberg y Schanferberg y propusieron al poder ejecutivo extraer e industrializar los gases liberados por el cráter Santiago (anhídrido sulfuroso y ácido clorhídrico, principalmente). El proyecto fue aceptado por el gobierno del entonces presidente Adolfo Díaz, quien buscó financiamiento rápido porque los gases del volcán, llevados por el viento, estaban secando las plantaciones de café en la arista de El Crucero y el llano de Pacaya.

El proyecto consistió en instalar un gran embudo de hierro alquitranado al intercráter para extraer los gases y conducirlos mediante largas tuberías a una planta que esperaban inaugurar fuera del cráter.

Como ciertos gases se colaban por los lados del embudo, decidieron los industriosos teutones dinamitar una pared del cráter circundante para que el derrumbe terminase de sellar los escapes. Para su infortunio, la explosión desplomó el intracráter y se tragó toda la parafernalia de los inversionistas.

La idea no era del todo mala, teniendo en cuenta que los conocimientos en Vulcanología no eran los de hoy, pero su fracaso era inevitable de todas formas, pues el Masaya es un ente vivo.

El lago de lava reapareció en 1946 y estuvo activo por 13 años. En 1965 la lava surgió nuevamente y era tan abundante que rellenó todo el fondo del cráter principal, amenazando con otro derrame ardiente a los pueblos vecinos, pero poco a poco se fue extinguiendo y hundiéndose en su conducto, hasta casi desaparecer en la década de los ochenta.

Todo parece indicar que el surgimiento de la lava obedece a un ciclo de 20 o 30 años, según lo intuyó el vulcanólogo Alexander McBirney. El ciclo parece confirmado con el reciente surgimiento del lago de lava en el fondo del Santiago, a comienzos de 2016, que todavía persiste y es causa de admiración de todos los que lo han observarlo, especialmente en horas de la noche. Cuando la luna domina el cielo, la imagen del volcán se viste en realidad como la “boca del infierno”, tal cual escribieron los españoles.

 

 

 

 


Best Spanish Schools in Granada Nicaragua

Top 10 Spanish Schools in Granada Nicaragua

By Raúl Gavarrette O.

Long has been the path since the early 80´s first Spanish language schools in Nicaragua opened in the northern Estelí Nicaraguan province. This self-sustainable clean industry has experienced a boom over the last years since late 90´s, particularly in Granada downtown, the first colonial city in Nicaragua. At the present, Granada has a growing network of independent Spanish language schools which through the years have gained experience and reputation among the increasing number of visitors that choose Nicaragua as the safest Central American country to visit.  Studying Spanish is a good option while visiting the country. Those who are planning or have already decided to visit Nicaragua should explore the possibility to make a great combination of a vacation trip with a few days, a couple of weeks, or even months of Spanish language study in Granada.

With so many new schools opening every year in this colonial city, it is someway kind of difficult to choose a Spanish school in Granada to study. It depends on the interests or what you are looking for and how much you want to spend. In the city streets you will find people not necessarily teachers, offering Spanish lessons in Granada for a few cents mostly for economic reasons. You cannot expect good quality from them. Perhaps if you just want to learn some Spanish words by heard and repetition and do not want to spend much this could be an option not the best yet.

Most of the Spanish schools in Granada offer a mixture of language instruction, volunteer opportunities and excursions to nearby destinations which include crater lakes, boat tours, cigar factories, and walking city tours. Lodging with local families in Granada is also included in the Spanish studies packets offered by the language schools. Each school has different prices for the Spanish courses ranging between $280 and $350 for a week. This mainly depends on the kind of course you choose and the quality of services they offer. The more weeks you take the cheaper you get. If you are seriously considering learning Spanish in Granada Nicaragua, having fun, experiencing the culture and enjoying the surroundings and the beautiful nature, you should have a look at these ten top Granada Spanish schools mentioned in this article. These are the Spanish language schools that have stood out for their reputation and experience, for their ethic and honesty, and the professionalism of the business.

1. Nicaragua Spanish Schools (http://www.nicaragua-spanish-lessons.com) is an independent language school located in Granada downtown a few blocks from the Central Plaza, in the surroundings of Xalteva Church, formerly situated in Convento San Francisco. This school offers Spanish immersion courses, one-on-one lessons and in small groups from basic beginners to advanced superior levels. The courses are combined with amazing afternoon excursions to local destinations which include nature reserves, national parks, crater lakes, boat tours in Lake Cocibolca; visits to open markets, handicraft factories, active and dormant volcanoes. This Nicaraguan Spanish language school offers also Spanish and Ceramic courses; Medical Spanish courses; Spanish for College students; Spanish for High School teachers and Online Spanish lessons. Homestay with friendly families is included in the course packet; all included packets. Most of the teachers speak English but they use it only when it is necessary or requested. The maximum size of the class is four students but average size is one-two students per class. Class material is provided. Spanish instruction is usually Monday to Friday all year round opening every Monday but any student can start any day of the week according to personal schedule on arrival. Students are offered to study one week course as minimum length but can take as many weeks as desired. Airport pickup from Managua to Granada is available if requested. Volunteering is also possible previous request. The staff is very enthusiastic and dynamic. The Director and the Administrative Assistant are also very nice. This school has been providing job opportunities to its teachers since 2004 at the very early organization stage and promoted conservationist and reforestation small projets in Laguna de Apoyo along with its partner school in that area. Students are offered to volunteer.

2. Casa Xalteva Spanish School (http://www.casaxalteva.org) situated by the Xalteva church offers a packet stressed on volunteering. It is one of the oldest Spanish schools established in Granada. Located in a quiet location, this school offers intensive Spanish courses for beginners, intermediate and advanced language students. The class size is two-three students per class, sometimes one- to-one. Lessons take place for four hours daily from Monday to Friday. The Spanish lessons are emphasized on conversational skills. Most of the instructors at the school speak English but they use only Spanish since the first day of class to encourage the students to speak, write and read the language from the very first day in the program. Classes start every Monday all year round. Minimum length of a course is one week but students can study for weeks or months if desired. Transportation from Airport available if requested.

3. SOL Spanish School (http://www.granadanicaraguaspanishschool.com), a language school family owned, is located at a few blocks from Central Park and from Xalteva Church. The school offers Spanish courses from beginners to advanced levels. SOL Spanish School has a wide range of courses for the students: Spanish immersion classes; Spanish classes only; combo programs; online Spanish classes; Volunteering and Spanish classes. The standard program includes Spanish classes Monday to Friday, lodging with a host family, and local afternoon activities. The activities include visits to museums, clinics, artisan shops, local factories, farms, and NGO´s. Classes are usually 8-12m. The class size is 1-2 students per class. The school provides class materials. Some of the teachers speak English and use it in the class if requested by students. Transfer from Managua Airport to Granada can be arranged through the school.

4. Nicaragua Mia Spanish School (http://spanishschoolnicaraguamia.com) is situated on Caimito Street, near Central Plaza in Granada. It is operated by a cooperative of women who offer Spanish courses: one-on-one intensive, Spanish for travelers, business Spanish, and classes for children. The courses include class materials. The school is opened throughout the year 8-5 pm. Classes start every Monday. The basic week course includes Spanish lessons Monday to Friday in the mornings, afternoon local excursions, and homestay with Granada families. Transportation from Airport to school in Granada is provided by school at an additional cost.

5. Ave Nicaraguita Spanish School (http://www.avenicaraguita.com) offers immersion courses and opportunities for volunteers. This language school is situated in El Arsenal Street. The Spanish courses help the participants to learn about the local culture and to be able to communicate effectively.  Operated by a local family, this school has contributed to the local economy by bringing lots of students to the Spanish programs which contributes to increase decent employment. The school offers Spanish courses in accordance with the student needs and availability of time. Living with a host family, afternoon activities, and Spanish instruction Monday to Friday throughout the year is part of the packet offered by this school. Some of the instructors speak English but they use it only if necessary. One week is the minimum time for a course. Students have the option to study as many weeks as they want. Transportation from Airport in Managua to Granada is provided by the school if requested.

6. Granada Spanish Lingua, (http://www.granadanicaraguaspanish.com), located a few blocks from the Central Park in Granada, offers a structured Spanish language immersion programs. The basic standard program at the school is per week and includes family homestay Sunday through Saturday and Spanish instruction Monday through Friday. Classes start any Monday of the year. There are volunteer opportunities for students. Students can register at this school for one week minimum length up to as many weeks are needed by the participants. Some of the teachers speak English and use it in case of need during the Spanish sessions. Airport transportation service to Granada, excursions, extra language tutoring, and homestay services are available separately from the basic combined program for registered students at this Spanish language school.

7. Spanish School Xpress (http://www.nicaspanishschool.com) is located in Calle Guzman, a few blocks from Central Plaza. It offers a complete program of Spanish immersion. Classes are adapted to the student’s interest and to his/her level of Spanish. The staff is young and very enthusiastic. Some of the teachers speak English if needed in the class. The basic program includes 20 hours of Spanish classes, 5 days a week, in the morning 8-12m; afternoon local activities, lodging with local families. Class material is supplied, one-on-one instruction. This Spanish school also offers customized programs, Spanish and Dancing, and business Spanish. Airport pickup provided upon request.

8. APC Spanish School (http://spanishgranada.com) is situated across from Central Park and offers language immersion classes.  The school is a project of the organization ‘The Association of Cultural Promoters’ (APC). Basically the school offers Spanish courses in the mornings, local daily excursions in the afternoons, room and board with local families. Students have opportunities to volunteer with local organizations through the school. Spanish courses for children are available at the APC School in Granada. Regular classes are Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The school is opened every day all year round.

9. One on One Tutoring is a family owned Spanish school, located along the street that links the Main Plaza with the Lake. It is the second oldest established Spanish language school in Granada. The school offers Spanish immersion programs; weekly lessons, one-on-one; regular class schedule 4 hours daily 5 days a week; and afternoon activities. The instructors rotate every hour, in order that students are exposed to a variety of accents as they switch between grammar, conversation and pronunciation. For a little more money students have access to an air conditioned classroom. The programs are for beginners, intermediate and advanced students, short and long-term. Classes are adapted to the students’ needs and learning style. Spanish lessons start any day of the week including weekends and holidays; school is open 8 am. to 8 pm. Optional staying with local family can be arranged through the school as well as transportation from Airport.

10. Mombacho Spanish School is situated along Calle La Libertad a few blocks from Central Park. This school opened recently but it has fast gained popularity, it provides Spanish instruction for all levels and adapted to student’s needs. The basic program includes Spanish language classes in the morning, afternoon activities, homestay. Classes are Monday to Friday all year round. The school has contact with organizations in Granada where volunteering is possible. The staff of the school is young, and enthusiastic. Airport transportation through the school is available if requested.


Masaya volcano, the tourist attraction in Nicaragua

Masaya volcano, the tourist attraction in Nicaragua

http://www.elnuevodiario.com.ni/nacionales/393681-volcan-masaya-atraccion-turistica-nicaragua/

Desafiando el intenso olor a azufre, los turistas se acercan para asomarse al pozo de lava que bulle muy cerca de la superficie en el cráter del volcán Masaya, cuya furia trataron de aplacar los indígenas en el pasado sacrificando doncellas y niños.

“Es algo extraordinario, único en el mundo”, dice a la AFP Noheli Pravia, una turista francesa mientras observa el turbulento magma que se aprecia desde el borde del cráter a menos de 100 metros de profundidad. El Masaya, el Kilauea de Hawai y el Nyiragongo de África son los únicos volcanes del mundo que forman de manera periódica efusiones de magma en su cráter, afirma el geógrafo y ambientalista nicaragüense Jaime Incer. La lava del “Masaya”, ubicado a 20 kilómetros de la capital nicaragüense, emerge a la superficie cada 25 o 30 años desde 1902 y después de un tiempo desaparece, pero mantiene la emisión de humos sulfurosos que se esparcen en los alrededores, oxidando los techos de las casas y asolando la vegetación.

Según Incer, si el material incandescente sube de nivel en cada aparición, es posible que dentro de 150 años el volcán haga una erupción similar a la de 1772, cuando el flujo llegó hasta donde hoy funciona el aeropuerto internacional. A unos kilómetros del volcán se asienta el pueblo de Piedra Quemada que guarda los vestigios de aquella erupción: un lecho de piedras volcánicas que yacen bajo un relleno de tierra. “Antes aquí no había tierra sino piedras”, dice a la AFP Sandra Pérez, uno de los 6,000 habitantes que han aprendido a vivir con el volcán y que no creen que sea una amenaza.

El pequeño cono, de 400 metros de altura, surgió hace 5,000 años. Está constituido por cinco cráteres de los cuales solo uno -llamado Santiago y el más grande- permanece activo, coronado por una densa fumarola. Hace seis meses, el agujero incrementó su actividad con flujos de magma acompañado de esporádicos microsismos. “Es la primera vez que veo algo como esto, es muy impresionante”, expresa Mijaela Cuba, una enfermera austriaca.

Ella es una de los 4,000 turistas que han subido a la ardiente garganta en las últimas dos semanas, cuando el Gobierno autorizó el ingreso de personas, aunque limitado a unos pocos minutos debido a los gases. Solo los pericos verdes y los murciélagos logran sobrevivir anidando permanentemente en el ambiente tóxico del cráter. Es “muy especial”, agrega entusiasmada la joven taiwanesa Sami Yen que toma fotos al borde del cráter desde donde se escucha el oleaje magmático.

El volcán está ubicado en la zona más poblada del Pacífico nicaragüense y forma parte de un área protegida de 54 kilómetros cuadrados, en la que sobresalen vastos campos de lava petrificada, poblada por blancos árboles de Sacuanjoche, la flor nacional. Abundan las serpientes, monos cara blanca y animales que soportan altas temperaturas, asegura el guía Luis Solano.

La boca del infierno

HISTORIA • Las llamas del “Masaya”, que hizo dos fuertes erupciones en 1670 y 1772, asustaron a los conquistadores españoles. “Es una boca de fuego que jamás deja de arder”, escribió en 1525 el primer gobernador Pedrarias Dávila, al rey de España. El fraile Francisco de Bobadilla creía que se trataba de la puerta al infierno, por lo que instaló una enorme cruz a la orilla del cráter.

Mientras que el codicioso Fray Blas del Castillo pensó que la lava era oro derretido y bajó colgado de una canasta para extraer material, según la leyenda. Los indígenas chorotegas que habitaron la zona trataron de calmar al enfurecido volcán ofreciendo en sacrificio niños y doncellas a la bruja “Chalchihuehe” que según ellos, vivía dentro del foso ardiente.

 


LAGUNA DE APOYO IN MASAYA

Laguna de Apoyo in Masaya, Nicaragua

http://turismoruralnicaragua.blogspot.com/2011/12/la-laguna-de-apoyo.html

Una gigantesca explosión volcánica, hace unos 23,000 años, originó una profunda caldera. Por la acción de la lluvia, a lo largo de miles de años, se fueron erosionando las ásperas rocas y las laderas inhóspitas se fueron cubriendo de una densa vegetación; mientras el escurrimiento del agua, poco a poco, fue formando esta belleza natural: la LAGUNA DE APOYO. El borde de la caldera se encuentra a unos 520 metros sobre el nivel del mar, en el punto del Mirador de Catarina, lo que permite una panorámica impresionante de la laguna y sus bosques, la ciudad de Granada, el volcán Mombacho y el contorno del lago de Nicaragua.

Desde el Mirador de Catarina, hasta el espejo de agua hay una diferencia de altura de 447 metros, porque la superficie de la laguna está a 73 metros sobre el nivel del mar. Su lecho tiene forma de embudo y en su parte más profunda el fondo está a unos 100 metros por debajo del nivel del mar; posee poca superficie de playa, por lo que nadar ahí se recomienda sólo para personas que saben nadar.  Las paredes de la caldera están cubiertas por un ecosistema de bosque subcaducifolio, significa que una parte de los árboles botan sus hojas en verano, pero hay otros que mantienen su follaje siempre verde. Por eso el paisaje de las laderas conserva cierto verdor, aún en los meses más secos del año. Según una evaluación ecológica rápida realizada en la laguna, hay unas 102 especies de plantas. De aves, se encontraron 105 especies. En cuanto a mamíferos, se encontraron 36 especies, entre ellas: Oso hormiguero (Tamandua mexicana), Mono cara blanca o Mono capuchino (Cebus capucinus) y Mono congo (Allouatta palliata). También cuenta con un ecosistema de laguna cratérica, con 11 especies de peces, al menos 3 de ellas son endémicas.  Leer más en:  http://turismoruralnicaragua.blogspot.com/2011/12/la-laguna-de-apoyo.html